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Optimizing Your Cancer Treatment

We seek to redefine your cancer management by using our expertise to find its genomic cause and determine the optimum treatment strategy for you. Let us be part of your journey towards better health.

Genomic Testing & Precision Medicine

Every cancer is associated with a unique combination of genomic changes. Furthermore, different cells within a tumor may harbor different genomic abnormalities. Comprehensive genomic profiling can identify such changes in cell signaling pathways by detecting prognostic and predictive biomarkers. This information can then be used to facilitate treatment decisions. This process is known as precision medicine.

  • Treatment Selection
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  • Disease Monitoring
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  • Risk Prediction
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About Our Tests

Our tests cover most major cancer types. Speak to your doctor to identify the appropriate test for you based on your cancer type.

View full list of our tests

Compare Our Tests

Find the most suitable test for you

What the test does

Provides comprehensive genetic information on potential therapeutic response (i.e. to targeted therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy)

 

Incorporates pathway-based analysis for a holistic overview & therapeutic recommendations

 

Focuses on clinically recommended biomarkers for targeted therapies

Focuses on biomarkers associated with lung cancer for targeted therapy

Identifies clinically relevant and future potential fusion biomarkers

Provides comprehensive genetic information for Somatic and/or Germline BRCA1/2 mutations (2 panels available: tissue or blood based)

Determines BRCA 1/2, LOH and HRD status for PARP inhibitor treatment

Monitors disease burden and treatment response/resistance

Monitors disease burden and treatment response/resistance

Monitors disease burden and treatment response/resistance

Monitors disease burden and treatment response/resistance

Provides targetable drug options using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

Evaluates and manages hereditary cancer risk#

Cancer types covered

All types of solid tumors (including common & rare cancers)

Common cancer types: lung cancer, gastric cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, etc.

Lung cancer

All types of solid tumors

BRCA-associated cancers: ovarian cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer

Ovarian cancer and HRD-/HRR-related cancer types

Other solid tumors (Pan-cancer)

Lung cancer

Breast cancer

Colon cancer

Brain metastases from lung cancer, breast cancer, etc.

9 major hereditary cancers & 11 hereditary cancer syndromes

Genes covered

440 cancer-related genes (including 13 fusion genes)

40 actionable genes (including 13 fusion genes)

13 lung-cancer-related genes (including 8 fusion genes)

13 fusion genes (covering both known & novel fusion transcripts)

BRCA1 & BRCA2

24 HRR-related genes (including BRCA1/2)

50 cancer-related genes

11 Lung-cancer-related genes

8 Breast-cancer-related genes

13 Colon-cancer-related genes

40 actionable genes

67 hereditary-cancer-related genes

Type of patients

All major solid tumors

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

Common solid tumors with biomarker focus

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

 

Newly diagnosed and metastatic cancer

All major solid tumors

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

Considering PARP inhibitor treatment

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

Considering PARP inhibitor treatment

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

Other solid tumors (Pan-cancer)

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

Lung cancer

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

Breast cancer

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

Colon cancer

 

Newly diagnosed, advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

All major solid tumors with brain metastases

 

Advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancer

An individual with a family history of cancer

 

An individual with multiple cancers

 

An individual with an early-onset or a rare cancer

 

An individual who is concerned about their risk of getting hereditary cancer

 

Couples who intend to start a family and want to know if they carry a cancer-causing genetic mutation§

Turnaround time *starting from the date of receipt of approved samples at our CAP-accredited laboratory

10 working days*

8 working days*

8 working days*

10 working days*

10 working days*

10 working days*

10 working days*

10 working days*

10 working days*

10 working days*

8 working days*

12 working days*

Specimen requirements *refer to our specimen instructions

Tumor tissue (FFPE)

Tumor tissue (FFPE)

Tumor tissue (FFPE)

Tumor tissue (FFPE)

Tumor tissue (FFPE) or Blood

Tumor tissue (FFPE) 

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

Blood 

Mutational profiling of HRR genes can be applied to other cancer types such as breast, pancreatic or prostate cancers.

# Genetic counselling is highly recommended prior to taking a genetic test for hereditary cancer screening.

§ For family planning, both members of the couple need to be tested so that the genetic counsellor can provide a complete review and recommendations.


Patient Stories

Ovarian Cancer Patient: Ms. Chang

Ovarian Cancer Patient: Ms. Chang

While fighting ovarian cancer for 18 years, Ms. Chang underwent several rounds of chemotherapy and surgery. At her last check-up, her cancer was found to have metastasized. She was at the point of accepting her fate when her attending doctor recommended genomic profiling, which led to a treatment recommendation that had not previously been considered.

Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Patient: Ms. Chen

Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Patient: Ms. Chen

The family members of 87-year-old Ms. Chen were reluctant that she be made to endure another surgery when her cancer relapsed owing to her age and effects of previous surgeries. Genomic profiling was then explored with her doctor to identify if she might be a candidate of immunotherapy. Fortunately, she is.

Stage 4 Lung Cancer Survivor: Mr. Yu

Stage 4 Lung Cancer Survivor: Mr. Yu

Mr. Yu wasn't a good candidate for targeted therapies owing to his negative results from the usual lung cancer biomarkers testing. His doctor later recommended a broader genomic panel, which provides a more comprehensive coverage, and eventually identified an important mutation that led to an effective treatment.

Liver Cancer Survivor: Dr. Andrew Tay

Liver Cancer Survivor: Dr. Andrew Tay

Unexpectedly diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma during his work trip, Dr. Andrew successfully underwent life-threatening surgery. He continues to regularly monitor his disease status through genomic profiling, which only requires a blood sample.

How to Get Started

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Step 1

Ask Your Doctor

Your doctor will consider your personal medical and treatment history to choose the most-appropriate genomic test, if indeed one is required. Our genomic testing services can only be obtained through a medical practitioner (doctor).

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Step 2

Submit Your Sample

Once the most-appropriate genomic test for you has been chosen, ACTG will coordinate with your doctor for the collection of your sample and for it to then be sent to our laboratory.

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Step 3

Time to Results

Upon receipt of your sample, it will first pass through our quality control process. Once approved, the testing will take between 8 and 21 working days depending on the genomic test that was ordered. The results will be sent to your doctor.

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Step 4

Report Consultation

At your next appointment, your doctor will take you through the results from the genomic testing and discuss their meaning with you. You then can both decide on the most-suitable treatment plan.

If you have any questions about genomic testing, please feel free to contact us.

FAQs

  • When should I consider doing genomic testing?

    There are several factors to consider before undergoing genomic testing; namely, type(s)of cancer(s), small panel vs big panel genomic testing, stage of disease, clinical guidelines recommendations, etc. First and foremost, you should discuss the benefits and limitations of genomic testing with your doctor.

    The decision to include genomic testing in your treatment management should be made as soon as possible. A comprehensive genomic test requires approx. 2-4 weeks, excluding any logistical processes. Therefore, making this decision as early as possible will provide you and your doctor with the information needed to decide upon an optimal treatment strategy in a timely manner. 

  • What kind of results can I expect from genomic testing?

    You may expect 3 possible results: i) detected mutation with treatment recommendations; ii) detected mutation with no treatment recommendation because of a lack of supporting clinical evidence; iii) no mutation found. Any of these three possible scenarios will serve as essential information for your doctor to determine your available treatment options. 

  • How often should I do genomic testing / When should I consider repeating genomic testing?

    This depends on your purpose for undergoing genomic testing. For example: i) for a disease monitoring purpose, blood can be taken at different times to evaluate the stage of your disease; ii) for a treatment purpose, blood or new tissue (biopsy) can be taken to re-do genomic testing when the disease has progressed or relapsed.

  • If I have a gene mutation(s) detected, will it affect my family members?

    This depends on the types of gene and mutation that are identified. If the genes are related to hereditary cancers, i.e.BRCA1/2, etc., your family members may consider undergoing hereditary genetic testing too. This will evaluate if an individual will be at a higher risk of contracting a hereditary cancer in their lifetime. The results report will also provide recommendations on how to manage any potential risk identified.

    Before proceeding with hereditary risk genetic testing, individuals should consult with a genetic counselor to discuss the benefits and limitations of the hereditary genetic test.  

  • Is genomic testing covered by my health insurance?

    Genomic testing is often considered as an out of pocket expense. However, increasingly, it is becoming more common for private insurance companies to cover the cost of genomic testing when it is deemed necessary to manage a disease. To determine how much of the cost would be covered, we would encourage you to request this information from your health insurance provider.